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How to Pack Wine Bottles for a Move

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Like pharmaceutical products, wine bottles, whether alcohol or non-alcoholic beverages, have delicate chemistry. So, when packed in a room with high or low humidity and temperature or directly under sunlight, they may damage.

The best way to minimize this risk is to find the best office moving companies near me that provide specialty packing services for valuable wine bottles. However, a DIY route is also possible with proper planning and preparation.

1. Things to do before boxing alcoholic beverages

As stated earlier, minimizing risk when transporting wine collection takes a lot of planning and preparation. To make a well-detailed packing and shipping plan for valuable alcohol collection, consider the following.

1.1 Check the rules of the destination country

The first thing wine owners should know is that every state will have a law to regulate personal wine shipment into the state. Before moving hours away to a new state, make sure the country allows personal alcohol shipment.

1.2. Inventory the alcoholic beverage collection

Simply put, make a detailed list of every liquor stored to know what should or should not be moved and keep track of them.

Moving long-distance means there’s a high chance of something going missing, especially when using a mover’s truck. An inventory makes it easy to track alcoholic beverages. This way, they don’t get lost during transportation. Plus, it also makes it easy to declutter wine storage so that the weight does not add up on moving estimates.

1.3. Evaluate your wine collection

Technically, every wine won’t have the same market value.

People who own a small collection of not-so-expensive liquors can easily pack up their alcoholic beverages and ship them. However, for people who own a large collection worth thousands of dollars, packing up wine bottles without doing an appraisal will be a wrong move.

When expensive liquors damage without knowing their market value, it means the collector won’t have purchased appropriate insurance for his or her collection, and it would be a big loss. Before shipping alcoholic beverages to the new house, get a reliable wine appraiser to determine the market worth of the liquors in storage. Then get proper insurance covers for them.

2. Packaging

The rules of the destination country, creating an inventory, and evaluating the collection are only the easy bits of packing wine collection for a move. The real work is how to pack them up. How does this work? Let’s find out.

2.1. Preparation

The first thing anyone with a wine collection will need to pack their liquor is packing materials. The most essential packaging materials one should invest in include:

  • Packing Paper: It is used to wrap the wine bottles
  • Bubble Wrap: it provides cushioning for liquors
  • Packing tape: It keeps the box shut tightly on the move
  • Specialty boxes: These serve as a storage space or shelter for the liquors
  • Corrugated sheets: It helps to divide the box into sections so the wines won’t clank when shipped
  • Marker: It helps to label the box

2.2. Learn the right way to pack bottles

Glitches may occur when transporting valuable liquors to a new place. Then again, learning how to pack wine bottles for moving the right way will ensure the move is smooth. Here’s how to pack wine bottles for a move.

  • Use specialty boxes

Use the right corrugated boxes designed specifically for wine bottles. Make sure to pack them in small boxes rather than big ones. This way, the boxes won’t tear during transportation.

  • Wrap them before placing them inside the box

Without wrapping wine bottles, they will easily break when they shake and bump into each other on the road. Instead, get packing paper or bubble wrap to wrap the liquor before placing them inside the box.

  • Use proper placement pattern

White and red wines are more prone to oxidation. So, place them on their sides or upside down so the corks won’t get dry and give way to oxygen which may cause them damage. However, the placement pattern for champagne and sparkling wine is preferably upright due to the gas carbons that make them sparkle and taste tingly.

  • Add cushioning to the box

Wrapping the liquors with packing paper and bubble wrap does not guarantee that they won’t damage on the drive. So, the best way to increase its safety is to pad the box, so it does not have empty spaces that will make the liquors clank. To do this, add extra packing paper or linens in empty spaces. Don’t forget to demarcate the box into sections with a corrugated sheet. This way, the liquors have enough room to keep it away from other bottles.

  • Use a double-box setup

Another good way to ensure that the box does not tear under the weight of valuable liquors is to double the box. The second box offers additional cushions like the corrugated cell dividers.

  • Ensure the temperature level is moderate

Temperatures above 55° will make wines spoil. So, make sure the temperature levels inside the van are appropriate for red, white, sparkling wine, or champagne. If it isn’t, feel several empty coolers with ice so the truck does not get too hot for liquors.

  • Don’t open them immediately

Relocating to a new place means the wine’s content will be in a state of unrest. So, don’t open them immediately after getting to the new house. Let them rest for seven days before opening any bottle.

Conclusion

Every wine collector loves their alcohol collection not because of its worth but its unique taste. But that doesn’t mean its value can be overlooked. On the other hand, shipping liquor bottles is risky and may leave them damaged. Just follow these steps on how to pack wine bottles in a luggage during relocation to get them safely to the new house.

 

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